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November 2006 No. 4


QLIF congress 2007

Improving sustainability in organic and low input food production systems


Training & exchange

Measuring food quality: concepts, methods and challenges


QLIF congress 2006

Papers and presentations at the Joint Organic Congress


QLIF research

Featured articles & new publications

· Consumption
· Production methods
· Crop production

· Livestock production

· Processing strategies


News & notes

Correspondence on research and mediation




Front

QLIF research

New publications on livestock production systems


Alternative protein crops in diets of organically housed weanling pigs

The effects of feeding weanling piglets diets with three different levels of three organic protein crops on performance and health were studied. Diets with 10, 20 or 30% field beans (tannin-free), 10, 20 or 30% white lupins (alkaloid-low) and 20, 40 or 60% quinoa (saponin-free) were compared with a control diet containing 15% soybean expeller and 2.2% soybeans. Based on the results in this trial, it can be concluded that inclusion levels up to 20% tannin-free field beans or 10% low alkaloid upins can be recommended in diets for weanling piglets. It might be that higher inclusion levels of field beans and lupins can be recommended when the ileally digestible amino acids levels are assessed correctly. Download report

C.M.C. van der Peet-Schwering, M.M. van Krimpen, P. Kemme, G.P. Binnendijk, J.T.M. van Diepen, A.W. Jongbloed and C. Henniphof-Schoonhoven (2006). Practical report no. 47 from the Animal Science Group at Wageningen.


Effect of rooting area and drinker in the outdoor run on behaviour and Ascaris infection of organic pigs

Hygiene is often a problem on the outdoor runs of growing organic pigs. The report shows that a rooting area attracts more pigs to the outdoor run and leads to a cleaner outdoor run. An extra outdoor drinker leads to a cleaner area around the drinker, but a dirtier indoor area. Infections with Ascaris suum are easily established and can be transferred from infected pigs to A. suum-free pigs. No influence of the treatment combinations could be demonstrated on egg output or liver condemnation figures. Download report

Herman M. Vermeer, Fred H. M. Borgsteede, Cor P.H. Gaasenbeek and Henk Altena (2006). Report from the Animal Sciences Group, Wageningen University and Research Centre, Lelystad, NL


Quality production in organic, low-input and conventional pig production

The report focus at consumer perception and differences in framework conditions of pig production in relation to high- and low-input as well as organic production systems. Moreover, traits relevant for quality assessment, and main factors that affect traits of product and process quality are elucidated. Download report

Albert Sundrum (2006). Quality production in organic, low-input and conventional pig production. Faculty of Organic Agricultural Sciences, University of Kassel, Germany.


Challenges for avoiding and handling disease problems in organic herds

To prevent disease, organic farmers assume that feeding, housing and care of the animals is such that the animals have an optimal natural defence to combat disease. To date there is little scientific evidence to support this assumption. These and further issues related to health management are discussed in ralation to consumer expectations. View paper

Prepared by Aize Kijlstra for the Joint Organic Congress, Odense, Denmark, May 30-31, 2006.


Handling the dry-off problem in organic dairy herds by teat sealing or homeopathy compared to therapy omission

Avoiding antibiotics is one of the goals in organic dairy herd health management. Thus, a trial with 102 cows was conducted to compare 2 common medical dry-off practices in organic dairying, internal teat sealant (Orbeseal®, Pfizer) and herd specific homeopathic remedies, with an untreated control. The results indicate that in herds with good udder health with few environmental infections, a treatment at drying off can be omitted, while sub-clinically in-fected cows could be treated by homeopathics. Only in case of increased environmental infection risk, a strategic teat sealant usage is recommended. View paper

Prepared by Peter Klocke, Silvia Ivemeyer, Michael Walkenhorst, Ariane Maeschli and Fritz Heil for the Joint Organic Congress, Odense, Denmark, May 30-31, 2006.


Silicas for control of the poultry red mite Dermanyssus gallinae

Control of the poultry red mite Dermanyssus gallinae is a challenge for organic as well as conventional egg producers. Diatomaceous earth (DE) without acaricides was at least as effective as DE supplemented with pyrethrum or essential oils and a liquid formulation of silica in vitro. In on farm experiments, DE was effective during a limited period only, whereas the liquid formulation had a very good residual effect over several weeks. View paper

Prepared by Veronika Maurer and Erika Perler for the Joint Organic Congress, Odense, Denmark, May 30-31, 2006.


Live-traps vs. Rodenticides on Organic Farms: which method works best?

Rodent control is important from a food safety perspective, especially on organic farms. However, extermination using cats and poison have their disadvantages. Live-traps might be an alternative: it fits better in the organic philosophy. But does it work? In this study we compared application of poison with use of live-traps by determining their efficacies on 20 organic pig farms. We found no difference between treatments, thus live-traps can form an alternative for poison. View paper

Prepared by Bastiaan G Meerburg, Henny G M Reimert and Aize Kijlstra for the Joint Organic Congress, Odense, Denmark, May 30-31, 2006.


Implications of genotype and amino acid supply on pork quality

An experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of different feeding regimes and genotypes on growth performance, carcass characteristics, composition and eating quality of pork under organic framework conditions. The results indicate that the limited availability of high quality feedstuffs in organic farming does not impair but improve the preconditions to produce pork of high eating quality. View paper

Prepared by Albert Sundrum, Yunior Acosta Aragon, C. Schulze-Langenhorst, L. Bütfering, M. Henning and G. Stalljohann for the Joint Organic Congress, Odense, Denmark, May 30-31, 2006.


The use of outdoor runs with rooting areas and drinkers by organic pigs

Hygiene is often a problem on the outdoor runs of growing organic pigs. Manure and urine are mainly excreted outside, but spread all over the run. A rooting area resulted in a cleaner outdoor area, however in some cases the rooting area became a dunging area. An extra outdoor drinker leads to a cleaner area around the drinker, but to a dirtier in-door area. View paper

Prepared by Herman M. Vermeer, Fred H M Borgsteede and Henk Altena for the Joint Organic Congress, Odense, Denmark, May 30-31, 2006.

Further information

The publications mentioned at this page derive from Subproject 4: Development of strategies to improve quality and safety and reduce cost of production in organic and “low input” livestock production systems.

· More about research in subproject 4
· All publications from subproject 4